What is a seed?

At first sight, when observing a seed what we see is the seminal cover. It can have different colours, shapes and textures, these variants are due to the evolution that each species has taken to facilitate its dissemination and ensure success in propagation.

The episperm or seminal cover protects the seed from external aggressions and allows the seed to be in a latent state, which can last a few months or several years depending on the temperature and humidity in which it is subjected.

Inside the seed, we find the three essential parts of an adult plant: embryonic root, stem and first or first leaves (cotyledons).

The embryonic root is the first part of the interior of the seed that is activated when the seed receives the information that the environmental conditions are ideal for germination.

The stem is the part that joins the embryonic root with the cotyledons or cotyledon and as a general rule, goes in the opposite direction to gravity and serves to transport nutrients from the plant. Cotyledons are the first leaves that the seed develops, some seeds have one and others two. Depending on the number of cotyledons, they receive a different name. Monocotyledons in the case of having one (example: onion, corn, wheat), and dicotyledons those that have two (example: tomato, melon, bean).

Every seed also contains a reserve of energy to be able to develop successfully. In our vegetables, we find two different ways of storing this energy: albumin and albumin.

In the exalbuminates, this energy is stored in the cotyledons as would be the case of beans. And in the albuminates this energy resides in what is called endosperm, a good example is a corn. This reserve of energy is intended to allow good development of the embryo in the transition from a dormant state to germinated plant.

Some reasons to save seeds

Through the selection of seeds, we will be able to preserve the diversity of the horticultural plants of our zone of culture, of this form we can select the plants that better adapt, either by the type of ground, the temperatures or of the quantity of water of which we have.

In the Iberian Peninsula, in a generalized way, we can differentiate the type of soil in: clay, limestone or silicon. It is important to know what type of soil we work on, as this will indicate which are the most important mineral needs to provide in the soil, and also serves to know which are the crops that best or worst will adapt to our orchard. In case of growing with packaged substrate, very common in urban garden, we can read the chemical analysis on the label.

A seed is the essence for future generations, with the experience of the past and the ability to create small changes of adaptability for the future.

What is a seed?

At first sight when observing a seed what we see is the seminal cover. It can have different colors, shapes and textures, these variants are due to the evolution that each species has taken to facilitate its dissemination and ensure success in propagation.

The episperm or seminal cover protects the seed from external aggressions and allows the seed to be in a latent state, which can last a few months or several years depending on the temperature and humidity in which it is subjected.

Inside the seed we find the three essential parts of an adult plant: embryonic root, stem and first or first leaves (cotyledons).

The embryonic root is the first part of the interior of the seed that is activated when the seed receives the information that the environmental conditions are ideal for germination.

The stem is the part that joins the embryonic root with the cotyledons or cotyledon and as a general rule, goes in the opposite direction to gravity and serves to transport nutrients from the plant. Cotyledons are the first leaves that the seed develops, some seeds have one and others two. Depending on the number of cotyledons, they receive a different name.

Monocotyledons in the case of having one (example: onion, corn, wheat), and dicotyledons those that have two (example: tomato, melon, bean).

Every seed also contains a reserve of energy to be able to develop successfully. In our vegetables we find two different ways of storing this energy: albumin and exalbumin.

In the exalbuminates this energy is stored in the cotyledons as would be the case of beans. And in the albuminadas this energy resides in what is called endosperm, a good example is corn. This reserve of energy is intended to allow a good development of the embryo in the transition from dormant state to germinated plant.

Some reasons to save seeds

Through the selection of seeds we will be able to preserve the diversity of the horticultural plants of our zone of culture, of this form we can select the plants that better adapt, either by the type of ground, the temperatures or of the quantity of water of which we have.

In the Iberian Peninsula, in a generalized way, we can differentiate the type of soil in: clay, limestone or silicon. It is important to know what type of soil we work on, as this will indicate which are the most important mineral needs to provide in the soil, and also serves to know which are the crops that best or worst will adapt to our orchard. In case of growing with packaged substrate, very common in urban garden, we can read the chemical analysis on the label.

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